Zoekresultaat: 2 artikelen

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Jaar 2014 x

    The focus of the diversity policy in the Dutch public sector has moved during the past decennia. In the eighties offering equal chances for the different target groups was the central policy goal, after the millennium this became the effective and efficient management of a diverse work force in order to arrive at a better performing public sector, also called the business case of diversity. This article investigates the question how far the Dutch cabinet has influenced the diversity policy of public organizations. The answer to the question is that there was limited influence from the Dutch cabinet on the arguments for diversity of public organizations, but there was greater influence on the diversity interventions, especially in three sectors: central government, municipalities and police. This influence on interventions of other (‘fellow’) governments is caused by the strong steering of the cabinet. The interventions undertaken therefore reflect to a more limited extent the business case of diversity and remain stuck in the old target group policy. However, public organizations with a longer history in diversity policy, that operate closer to society and see the necessity for diversity, are more inclined to embrace the business case and start interventions that are related to this new approach.


Drs. Saniye Celik
Drs. S. Celik is accountmanager voor de decentralisaties in het sociaal domein bij het Ministerie van Binnenlandse Zaken en Koninkrijksrelaties en buitenpromovenda aan het Instituut Bestuurskunde van de Universiteit Leiden, Campus Den Haag.
Artikel

Het ongrijpbare onbehagen

Tijdschrift Beleid en Maatschappij, Aflevering 1 2014
Trefwoorden Discontent, Public opinion, (Social) media, Democracy, Civil society
Auteurs Dr. Dieneke de Ruiter en Jasper Zuure MSc
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    Since Pim Fortuyn, discontent has become a central issue in public and political debates in the Netherlands. The government tries to ban out all risks and polarisation between citizens, because it fears this will have a destabilising impact on society. However, these measures do not seem to decrease discontent. In this article, we analyse why discontent so persistently keeps dominating debates. We argue that it is prominently and continuously expressed due to the position of opinion polls and the interaction between politicians, journalists and citizens and due to the platform that social media offer. But meanwhile, means to convert discontent into constructive, collective action are diminishing. As a result we continuously gather superficial information about people’s discontent. In order not to hinder constructive debates with this kind of information, as happens in current political discussions, different and more detailed information about the public opinion is needed. Politicians and researchers should make a more clear distinction between discontent itself and the incapacity of citizens to deal with it. Moreover, a revitalisation of the role of civil organisations is important to channel discontent.


Dr. Dieneke de Ruiter
Dr. Dieneke de Ruiter is senior adviseur bij de Raad voor Maatschappelijke Ontwikkeling (RMO). E-mail: d.de.ruiter@adviesorgaan-rmo.nl.

Jasper Zuure MSc
Jasper Zuure MSc is adviseur bij de Raad voor Maatschappelijke Ontwikkeling (RMO). E-mail: j.zuure@adviesorgaan-rmo.nl, www.adviesorgaan-rmo.nl.
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