Zoekresultaat: 11 artikelen

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    Access to affordable, decent and secure housing is under increasing pressure in countries across the world, especially in burgeoning cities. This results in displacement, exclusion and increasing housing cost burdens. This theme issue consists of a collection of papers that approach inequality on urban housing markets from different angles. In this introduction to the special issue, we provide a framework to understand these various dimensions of inequality and their interconnectedness. We identify three scales of inequality: First, at the abstract level of housing systems, market developments and housing policies contribute to increasing housing costs and a reduction in affordable housing units. Second, at the urban level we identify increasing spatial segregation between populations as well as the intertwined trends of intensifying gentrification and suburbanization of poverty. Third, at the everyday level we can identify a loss of belonging among long-term residents of changing (gentrifying) neighbourhoods, while other residents may appreciate change. This also fosters the potential for conflict and poses new challenges to professionals dealing with families in situations of poverty. We argue that emerging inequalities at these different scales need to be considered as interconnected.


Dr. Cody Hochstenbach
Dr. Cody Hochstenbach is secretaris van de redactie van Beleid en Maatschappij.

Dr. Nanke Verloo
Dr. Nanke Verloo is lid van de redactie van Beleid en Maatschappij.
Artikel

Access_open Hogere waardering voor gemengde wijk

Bewoners in Rotterdam Zuidwijk over de instroom en ingreep in hun veranderende wijk

Tijdschrift Beleid en Maatschappij, Aflevering 3 2019
Trefwoorden Perception of neighbourhood change, Diversity, Belonging, Social mix, Social housing
Auteurs Dr. ir. André Ouwehand
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    This paper investigates the effects of neighbourhood change caused by the inflow of new residents in the still existing social rental stock in a post-World War II district next to the effects of the changing population as the result of urban restructuring. All residents, native Dutch and residents that belong to an ethnic minority, are critical about the occurring concentration of the latter in the existing rental housing stock. Loss of respectability and of shared norms and values of how to live in the neighbourhood play an important role in the critical stance of mostly older Dutch native residents. Residents with a migrant background criticize the concentration as a negative influence for their integration in Dutch society. Most residents support the idea of a mixed neighbourhood based on income and ethnicity. Restructuring by demolition of old social rental dwellings and new housing development for owner-occupiers is supported by most residents, based on the positive impact on the liveability. Urban restructuring has however not decreased the share of non-Dutch-native residents but it did bring more middle-class households. In the view of the residents these are ‘decent people’ as they have to work in daytime and do not linger at night in the streets.


Dr. ir. André Ouwehand
Dr. ir. André Ouwehand is gastonderzoeker OTB – Onderzoek voor de gebouwde omgeving aan de faculteit Bouwkunde van de Technische Universiteit Delft.
Artikel

Access_open Sociaal werk in stadswijken waar problemen zich opstapelen

Tijdschrift Beleid en Maatschappij, Aflevering 3 2019
Trefwoorden Residualisering, Stedelijk sociaal werk, Concentratie van sociale problematiek, Link work, Geuzenveld
Auteurs Dr. Saskia Welschen en Dr. Lex Veldboer
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    The impact of residualisation on social work has so far hardly been explored. Based on existing literature and recently started empirical research in Amsterdam we analyze several consequences. Residualisation refers to the process whereby urban social housing is strictly allocated to the lowest income groups. What does this concentration of disadvantaged households mean for the role of social workers? Firstly, for community workers residualisation mostly implies a renewed role as instigators of residents’ participation in urban renewal trajectories for social mix. Furthermore community activities are increasingly used to offer safe havens for new and old groups of residents and also to prevent expensive treatments for several residential groups. For social workers focusing on individual support or casework residualisation results in an increasingly complex caseload. Residualisation does not imply extra formation for social work, but rather extra attention for the effortful coproduction of welfare between formal and informal actors. Within this playing field, we distinguish link work as vital for both formal and informal social work. Link work is about establishing vertical and horizontal connections between different worlds, across sectoral, professional or trust gaps. We expect that in areas of residualisation successful urban social work is dependent on strong linking skills.


Dr. Saskia Welschen
Dr. Saskia Welschen is senior onderzoeker aan de Hogeschool van Amsterdam en zelfstandig onderzoeker.

Dr. Lex Veldboer
Dr. Lex Veldboer is lector aan de Hogeschool van Amsterdam.
De blinde vlek

Sociale menging? Vergeet de elitewijken niet!

Tijdschrift Beleid en Maatschappij, Aflevering 1 2019
Trefwoorden Urban policy, Social mixing, Spatial segregation, Housing, Gentrification
Auteurs Dr. Cody Hochstenbach
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    The most relevant part of a discussion is not what is discussed but what cannot be spoken of. The real taboos are those for which it is taboo to call them taboos. The status quo defines itself as non-ideological while denouncing any challenge to itself as radical. Therefore the column ‘De Blinde Vlek’ frames the framers, politicizes the status quo and articulates what is not heard of.


Dr. Cody Hochstenbach
Dr. Cody Hochstenbach is postdoctoraal onderzoeker stadsgeografie aan de Universiteit van Amsterdam en lid van de redactie van Beleid en Maatschappij.
Artikel

Access_open Huisvestingsbeleid en nieuwe scholen

Over de noodzaak van een geografisch perspectief op onderwijs

Tijdschrift Beleid en Maatschappij, Aflevering 4 2016
Trefwoorden housing policies, education markets, new schools, educational geography, friction costs
Auteurs Prof. dr. Sietske Waslander
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    While international research gives increasing attention to geographical factors in education, this perspective is lacking in Dutch research and policy. That a geographical perspective is badly needed, is demonstrated on the basis of the proposed policy to promote new schools in the Netherlands. Current housing policies for Dutch schools are described, pointing at disputes between municipalities and school boards who hold shared responsibilities. Next, foreign housing policies for new schools are studied, that is for friskolor in Sweden, free schools in England and charter schools in Texas (USA). Experiences abroad not only testify that very different choices can be made, but indicate that housing policies may in the long run have a substantial impact on segregation and educational inequality. It is also shown that new schools are mainly located in urban areas. It is argued that in addition to costs for new schools, friction costs for existing schools need to be considered. In all, a geographical perspective on education is needed, so as to prevent increasing segregation and social inequality as well as wasting public financial resources.


Prof. dr. Sietske Waslander
Prof. dr. Sietske Waslander is als hoogleraar sociologie verbonden aan de TIAS School for Business and Society en actief in het GovernanceLAB van TIAS.


Prof. dr. Maarten van Ham
Prof. dr. Maarten van Ham is hoogleraar stedelijke vernieuwing aan de Delft University of Technology.
Artikel

Het probleem van laaggeschooldheid in België: een historisch-geografische analyse

Tijdschrift Beleid en Maatschappij, Aflevering 2 2014
Trefwoorden human capital, unskilled, school dropout, geographical segregation
Auteurs Drs. Frederik Van Der Gucht en Prof. dr. Raf Vanderstraeten
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    This article presents an analysis of the geographical clustering at the bottom end of the human capital distribution within Belgium and its major political regions (namely, the Flemish and the Walloon Region). At the national level, there is both a clear decrease of the shares of unskilled and unqualified adults and of their regionally unequal distribution. However, this overall decrease goes along with growing divergences between Flanders and Wallonia. In Flanders the number of early school leavers has become small. In Wallonia economic problems – measured in terms of unemployment rates – go hand in hand with a comparatively high number of school dropouts. Our empirical findings suggest that the success of particular areas and regions in a knowledge-intensive economy depends not only on the presence of highly skilled and highly qualified human capital, but also suffers from the presence of relatively large shares of the less-skilled. We discuss some implications for political decision-making.


Drs. Frederik Van Der Gucht
Drs. Frederik Van Der Gucht is als onderzoeker verbonden aan de vakgroep Sociologie van de Universiteit Gent (België). E-mail: frederik.vandergucht@ugent.be.

Prof. dr. Raf Vanderstraeten
Prof. dr. Raf Vanderstraeten is als hoogleraar verbonden aan de vakgroep Sociologie van de Universiteit Gent (België) en als fellow aan het Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies (Finland). www.cst.ugent.be. E-mail: raf.vanderstraeten@ugent.be.
Artikel

Privaat beheerde woondomeinen: beloftevol of beangstigend fenomeen?

Tijdschrift Beleid en Maatschappij, Aflevering 1 2011
Trefwoorden housing enclave, gated community, Netherlands, local government
Auteurs Jasper Eshuis, Erik-Hans Klijn en Mark van Twist
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    In recent years the Netherlands have seen an upsurge of housing enclaves. The enclaves are often built as courtyards, castles, estates or apartment complexes. The growing number of people living in housing enclaves indicates a demand for this kind of living areas. However, the motivations behind the increasing popularity of housing enclaves are unclear. Is this a reflection of a long standing tradition of people staying in their own social group, seeking for belonging and sociability? Or does it fit in a global trend of searching for security in gated communities? This paper presents empirical research in the Netherlands that addresses peoples’ motives for living in housing enclaves, as well as the role of the local government in relation to housing enclaves. The research shows that residents of housing enclaves seek a pleasant living environment in the first place, while security is a less important motive. The study gives reason for planners and developers outside the US not to assume that fear of crime and a wish for security are the main reasons for moving to housing enclaves. Further, the study shows that housing enclaves are not completely privatized areas. Local government still has an important role to play.


Jasper Eshuis
Jasper Eshuis is senior wetenschappelijk onderzoeker bestuurskunde aan de Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam. Correspondentiegegevens: dr. ir. J. Eshuis, Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam, vakgroep Bestuurskunde, Postbus 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam, eshuis@fsw.eur.nl.

Erik-Hans Klijn
Erik-Hans Klijn is hoogleraar bestuurskunde aan de Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam.

Mark van Twist
Mark van Twist is hoogleraar bestuurskunde aan de Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam.
Artikel

De ruimtelijke gevolgen van demografische krimp

Tijdschrift Beleid en Maatschappij, Aflevering 4 2008
Auteurs Frank van Dam, Femke Verwest en Carola de Groot
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    In the near future a growing number of Dutch regions and municipalities will experience a decline in population and household numbers. However, compared with other countries, the impending population shrinkage in the Netherlands will be modest, if not insignificant. The spatial consequences of this demographic decline will be limited. Other factors, such as economic growth, behavioural change and spatial planning policy, will have a more important influence on spatial development. The fixation on population numbers in both the public debate about demographic decline and in policy-making is therefore misplaced and futile. Insofar as demographic trends already have an influence on spatial developments, it is primarily through changes in household numbers and population composition, for example in relation to housing needs. This does not mean that demographic decline will not raise issues pertinent to spatial development policy. In municipalities and regions, falling household numbers may push up housing vacancy rates and exacerbate segregation, leading to a reduction in the quality of the living environment. These negative consequences will be concentrated in specific districts, neighbourhoods and villages. Demographic decline is not only a threat; it also presents opportunities. In regions currently suffering from serious housing shortages, a shrinking number of households will relieve pressure on the housing market. In addition, contraction of local and regional populations will open up opportunities for reducing densities and 'greening' these neighbourhoods. When anticipating or responding to demographic decline, local and regional governments mainly adopt a strategy of improving the quality of the housing stock and stimulating employment. In both cases, there is a danger of competition between local authorities (or regions and provinces), which may lead to uneconomic spatial investments and irreversible spatial developments.


Frank van Dam
Frank van Dam is als onderzoeker verbonden aan het Planbureau voor de Leefomgeving (PBL). Correspondentiegegevens: Dr. F. van Dam Planbureau voor de Leefomgeving Oranjebuitensingel 6 / Postbus 30314 2511 VE Den Haag / 2500 GH Den Haag 070-3288798 frank.vandam@pbl.nl

Femke Verwest
Femke Verwest is als onderzoeker verbonden aan het Planbureau voor de Leefomgeving (PBL).

Carola de Groot
Carola de Groot is als onderzoeker verbonden aan het Planbureau voor de Leefomgeving (PBL).
Artikel

Grip op de post-Euclidische stad?

Oefeningen in de regio Amsterdam

Tijdschrift Beleid en Maatschappij, Aflevering 2 2006
Auteurs Willem Salet
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    Cities are in stage of transformation under the combined effect of enlargement of scale and the enlargement of scope of urban activities. The enlargement of scale is visible in the regionalization of urban development. Housing markets, labor markets and mobility patterns crystallize at regional level. However, the scaling up of urban life is not just an extension of the city as is experienced over more than a century. The simultaneous enlargement of scope makes the transformation more complex and dependant on external connections, both in the private and the public sector. The essay explores concepts that try to explain the nature of this new complexity. What is the meaning of 'urban space' and 'urban place' under the conditions of globalization? And what are the consequences for the guidance of collective action in the context of multi actor and multi level governance? The nature of urban change is illustrated in the case of the Randstad Holland, in particular the region of Amsterdam.


Willem Salet
Willem Salet is hoogleraar planologie aan de Universiteit van Amsterdam, Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen. Recente publicatie: W. Salet en Stan Majoor, 2005, Amsterdam Zuidas European Space, Rotterdam: 010 Uitgevers. Adres: AMIDSt, Nieuwe Prinsengracht 130, 1018 VZ Amsterdam, e-mail: W.G.M.Salet@uva.nl
Artikel

Onderwijssegregatie in de grote steden

Tijdschrift Beleid en Maatschappij, Aflevering 2 2005
Auteurs Sjoerd Karsten, Charles Felix, Guuske Ledoux e.a.
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    Across Europe, urban education systems are struggling with the process of integration of immigrants in its schools. This article explores the most important aspects of this new urban phenomenon and its impact on urban school systems in the Netherlands. It clearly shows that ethnic segregation in elementary and secondary schools is widespread in Dutch cities. This ethnic segregation is caused by a combination of residential segregation, and, as our own studies prove, of parental choice. The article also deals with recent Dutch studies on the effects of segregation. Finally, it treats the question how schools and authorities, in a long-standing tradition of parental choice, are dealing with this segregation.


Sjoerd Karsten
Sjoerd Karsten is Universitair hoofddocent onderwijsbeleid, Universiteit van Amsterdam. Adres: SCO-Kohnstamm Instituut, Wibautstraat 4, 1091 GM Amsterdam, tel.: 020 - 525 1232, e-mail: S.Karsten@uva.nl

Charles Felix

Guuske Ledoux

Wim Meijnen

Jaap Roeleveld

Erik van Schooten
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