Zoekresultaat: 3 artikelen

x
De zoekresultaten worden gefilterd op:
Jaar 2005 x Rubriek Artikel x

    This article examines the impact of the EU on the content of policy. It analyses two cases in which the EU affected Dutch policies in different ways: in the case of packaging waste policy the EU exerted direct influence through EU legislation, whereas in the case of railway policy, the EU only had an indirect impact through policy models. Nevertheless, the impact of the EU was greater in the railway policy case than in the packaging waste case. This suggests that domestic political processes are more important in explaining the impact of the EU on policy content, than the degree of legal adaptation pressure. In addition, the article shows that the EU has affected the policy networks in the area of packaging waste policy, even though Dutch corporatist structures have shown remarkable resilience and have even been strengthened by the implementation requirements of EU legislation in this field.


Markus Haverland
Dr. Markus Haverland is docent/onderzoeker bij het departement Bestuurskunde van de Universiteit Leiden. Adres: Pieter de la Court gebouw, Postbus 9555, 2300 RB Leiden, e-mail: mhaverland@fsw.leidenuniv.nl

    Member states must transpose European directives into national rules. This process, however, is not without problems. The Netherlands regularly transposes directives too late. Moreover, very often the content of the national transposition rules does not match the adaptations required by the directives. This article examines whether political resistance or administrative and legal weaknesses cause these problems. The author concludes that problems regarding transposition are caused by a culture of neglect and lack of priority for EU policies. Improving coordination procedures, formal legislative processes, and information facilities will not solve transposition problems as long as the cultural aspect of the problem isn't adequately addressed.


Ellen Mastenbroek
Drs. Ellen Mastenbroek is Assistent in Opleiding bij de departementen Bestuurskunde en Politieke Wetenschap aan de Universiteit Leiden. Adres: Pieter de la Court gebouw, Postbus 9555, 2300 RB Leiden, e-mail: mastenbroek@fsw.leidenuniv.nl

    This article poses the question whether the Dutch system of organized interest representation faces a transformation from neo-corporatist mediation to lobbyism similar to Scandinavian countries. Its main claim is that this has so far not been the case, because two essential features of neo-corporatist interest mediation have remained prominent in the Netherlands. First, policies regarding labour conditions continue to be determined within a network of employers' organisations, trade unions, and the government that is essentially closed to outsiders. Second, the system continues to be hierarchical in nature: the government, often below the surface, demonstrates a considerable capacity to steer the participants in its preferred direction. Such a closed network still allows for lobbying the parliament by both network members and outsiders. Lobbying may thus be complementary to closed neo-corporatist networks rather than a substitute. The article offers a research agenda exploring the latter suggestion.


Agnes Akkerman
Agnes Akkerman is als universitair docent verbonden aan de Faculteit der Management Wetenschappen van de Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen. Recente publicaties van haar hand zijn 'Identifying Latent Conflict in Collective Bargaining', Rationality and Society 15(1): 15-43; 'A theory of soft policy implementation in multilevel systems with an application to Dutch social partnership', Acta Politica 39(1): 31-58. Adres: Thomas van Aquinostraat 5, Postbus 9108, 6500 HK Nijmegen,
Interface Showing Amount
U kunt door de volledige tekst zoeken naar alle artikelen door uw zoekterm in het zoekveld in te vullen. Als u op de knop 'Zoek' heeft geklikt komt u op de zoekresultatenpagina met filters, die u helpen om snel bij het door u gezochte artikel te komen. Er zijn op dit moment twee filters: rubriek en jaar.